Staying firmly behind the times is as traditional in Indiana as basketball, racing, and wearing shorts in 45-degree weather. Having just legalized Sunday alcohol sales this year, it wouldn’t be a surprise if Indiana was also last to legalize cannabis—unless the handful of lobbyists that ultimately control our vice industry cut themselves a big enough piece. From puritans to profiteers, here are the top reasons pot isn’t legal in Indiana.

David Powell, executive director of the Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council (IPAC)

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of The Indiana Lawyer

The IPAC has made their stance well known on the issue of legalization in the Hoosier state, and continues to cling to D.A.R.E-era “science” classifying marijuana as a “gateway drug.” Powell also loves the tautology of a Schedule I substance lacking a rich bed of scientific study data, as many of his Republican colleagues also do: “It doesn’t lower crime rates. It doesn’t lower opiate use. In fact, it makes opiate use three times more likely if you’re using marijuana. But, nobody wants to talk about the data really and the research. They want to talk about the anecdotes.”

Brian Bosma, Speaker of the Indiana House, pocket pet of GEO Group

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of Indiana House Republicans

Bosma has been historically against any and all legalization efforts, even in the wake of Indiana’s critically underfunded DCS system and marijuana legalization success in other states. Don’t get your hopes up on his interest in a study, either: Bosma’s position is unlikely to change as long as private prison lobbies continue to pour money into his campaign. “I think we need to take a look at the effects,” Bosma said. “And I support a study.”

GEO Group, just one of many evil private prison empires

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Philipp Strazny/ Wikimedia Commons

The Florida-based private prison corporation has been dumping cash into state elections for years, and Indiana is one of their top 10 favorite states to spend on. Not only has Bosma taken GEO’s money, but they helped get then-governor Mike Pence elected. In turn, he lowered the felony possession threshold from a half-ounce to a third of an ounce of marijuana, and signed a state contract with the group guaranteeing 90% prison capacity at all times. Current Governor Eric Holcomb hasn’t mentioned any plans to change the law.

Jim Purucker, Lobbyist, general sleazebag

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of Indy Star

Thanks to Indiana’s puritanical roots, the ratchet-tight laws governing our vices are ultimately controlled by the handful of lobbyists who get their handpicked leaders elected, and none are quite as slimy as Jim Purucker. Like your sister’s shady boyfriend, he offered politicians on both sides of the aisle an “investment opportunity” in a “technology company” that would ultimately control the marijuana market in the state. The scheme was uncovered by an IndyStar investigation after an unusual line of vaguely-worded legislation was added to a state bill that could have been used to create a marijuana monopoly in Indiana. Once the Republican supermajority heard of the change, they killed the bill entirely.

State Senator Travis Holdman, or the other guy

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of Hoosiers 4 Holdman

Ultra-conservative Holdman attempted to be the one Republican in the Indiana Senate with a tiny bit of sense by drafting a law that would have protected transgender people from discrimination. The bill also had huge loopholes for religious orgs, but Holdman was unable to convince his colleagues and constituents of the basic human rights of trans people, and instead opted to whine in his local paper about how hard it was for him to fail at growing a spine. We can similarly expect Holdman to fold like a lawn chair against his Northern Indiana  “don’t drink, don’t dance” base when legalization comes up again next session — if Holdman can hold onto his seat with a challenge from an even more conservative candidate.

Senator Dan Coats, living fossil

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of WhiteHouse.gov

NORML gave Coats a D- rating, and Coat’s voting record indicates he is unlikely to vote apart from the 1950s aspirations of his party. Another big fan of “vintage” science on marijuana, Coats clings to the line about gateway drugs and correlation-does-not-equal-causation studies of what other substances marijuana smokers are “more likely” to be involved in.

Senator Joe Donnelly, the pleather sofa of Democrats

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of the US Senate

Donnelly has milquetoasted himself into red state danger by attempting to court centrists, and in doing so has found himself defending cannabis prohibition like the Footloose townsfolk defended the dancing ban. Donnelly could pull himself out of trouble by siding with the 60+ percent of Hoosiers who support legalization, but he’s decided to bet on the hand-wringing church ladies and lethargic brand of “progressivism” that has historically defined Hoosier Democrats.

“I do not believe it to be prudent to decriminalize marijuana at this time.”

The Indiana State Legislature, Confederacy of Dunces

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Massimo Catarinella/ Wikimedia Commons

On a state level, Indiana suffers from the hard-right malaise that suffuses all states with bright red legislatures. Even if, by some miracle, Indiana’s Republican party woke up to the obvious economic potential of a legal cannabis market, the utterly incompetent den of thieves would find themselves unable to pass the law. Even with legislative omnipotence, the IN GOP managed to run out of time to pass their own agenda, requiring a one-day special session that cost taxpayers $30,000, and also just so happened to eliminate the chance for public testimony on the four leftover bills. As the very last state in the whole union to legalize Sunday alcohol sales just this year (a deal that was ultimately struck between two lobbying groups), the chances of Indiana coming to its senses even on decriminalization, let alone legalization, is not a likely short-term outcome.

Indiana AG Curtis Hill, Indiana’s square Dad

All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana

Courtesy of the Indiana Government

Curtis Hill is the kid in every class that asks the teacher for more homework before picking up an extra hall monitor shift. A big fan of wasting taxpayer dollars on lawsuits with predictable ends, Hill fancies himself the very definition of law enforcement and pushed back against several county prosecutors who declined to fight pointless anti-abortion lawsuits. While the state continues to be ravaged by the heroin epidemic, Hill refuses to see the treatment-funding forest for the burning, sticky trees, and he wears his membership jacket to the Head in the Sand Club with pride: “Legalizing marijuana is a road to nowhere good.”

The post All the Reasons Pot Isn’t Legal in Indiana appeared first on High Times.

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1. What is CBD? What is CBD Oil?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally occurring constituent of industrial hemp/cannabis. Its formula is C21H30O2 and it has a molecular mass of 314.4636. It is the most abundant non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in cannabis, and is being scientifically investigated for various reasons.

CBD oil is a cannabis oil (whether derived from marijuana or industrial hemp, as the word cannabis is the latin genus name for both) that has significant amounts of cannabidiol (CBD) contained within it. Our CBD products and extracts are derived from industrial hemp, so they could be considered CBD-rich hemp oil, hemp derived CBD oil, CBD-rich cannabis oil, or plainly “hemp extracts” since they typically contain much more than just CBD. Again, cannabis doesn’t mean marijuana, but is the genus name, and general umbrella term which all forms of marijuana and hemp fall under. The form of cannabis we use for our CBD and hemp extracts is industrial hemp; we do not sell marijuana.

2. If a hemp extract is 40% cannabinoids, what’s the other 60%? What’s in your hemp extracts besides the naturally occurring cannabinoids?

Our Kentucky hemp extracts contain over 80 different phyto-cannabinoids such as cannabidiol (CBD), CBC, CBG, CBN, etc.. In addition to the cannabinoids naturally present in our agricultural hemp extracts, there are also many other types of natural molecules and phyto-chemical compounds such as amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins (including B1, B2, B6, D), fatty acids (including omega 3 & 6), trace minerals (including iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium), beta-carotene, chlorophyll, flavanoids, ketones, nitrogenous compounds, alkanes, glycosides, pigments, water, and terpenes. The most common terpenes in our hemp extracts are Myrcene, Beta-caryophyllene, Terpinolene, Linalool, alpha-Pinene, beta-Pinene, Nerolidol og Phytol, trans-alpha-Bergamotene, Limonene/ beta-Phellandrene (Co-elution), and alpha-Humulene.

3. What’s the difference between Hemp and Marijuana?

Scientifically, industrial Hemp and Marijuana are the same plant, with a genus and species name of Cannabis Sativa. They have a drastically different genetic profile though. Industrial Hemp is always a strain of Cannabis sativa, while marijuana can be Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, or Cannabis ruderalis. The major difference is how industrial hemp has been bred compared to a marijuana form of Cannabis sativa. organic hemp seedsTypically speaking, industrial hemp is very fibrous, with long strong stalks, and barely has any flowering buds, while a marijuana strain of Cannabis sativa will be smaller, bushier, and full of flowering buds. However, newer industrial hemp varieties in the USA are being bred to have more flowers and higher yields of cannabinoids and terpenes, such as our Kentucky hemp we’re now using!

99% of the time marijuana has a high amount of THC and only a very low amount of CBD. Hemp, on the other hand, naturally has a very high amount of CBD in most instances, and only a trace amount of THC. Fortunately, the cannabinoid profile of hemp is ideal for people looking for benefits from cannabis without the ‘high.’ Hemp is used for making herbal supplements, food, fiber, rope, paper, bricks, oil, natural plastic, and so much more, whereas marijuana is usually used just recreationally, spiritually, and medicinally. The term cannabis oil can refer to either a marijuana or hemp derived oil, since marijuana and hemp are two different forms of cannabis.

In the USA the legal definition of “industrial hemp,” per Section 7606 of the Agricultural Appropriations Act of 2014, is “INDUSTRIAL HEMP — The term ‘‘industrial hemp’’ means the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

4. Are hemp derived cannabinoids such as CBD as good as CBD from marijuana?

The short answer is yes. CBD is CBD, whether from marijuana or hemp. Most marijuana has a very low non-psychoactive cannabinoid profile (like CBD, CBC, CBG), so most of the time hemp would be much more preferable for anything besides THC. Marijuana is usually very high in THC (gives people the high) but usually very low in other non-psychoactive cannabinoids.

Nowadays in the USA, many farmers are growing industrial hemp flowers that are just as beautiful, odor-producing, and terpene rich as the best marijuana strains, such as our partnered farmers in Kentucky.

5. Why don’t you source your Hemp and CBD from within Colorado?

colorado growing operationWe feel that the hemp program in Kentucky is more well suited for our company in regards to growing hemp, and that because it’s 100% compliant with Section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill (and the 2016 Agricultural Appropriations Act), procuring it from there is perfectly legal at the federal level. Kentucky’s ecology is perfect for hemp just as it is for tobacco. The growing season is longer than in Colorado, and the soil is richer, so the quality of the hemp and the yields are better.

6. What’s the percentage of cannabinoids and CBD in your product?

Our raw extracts have varying percentages of cannabinoid and cannabidiol (CBD) content, the range being 10%-99%. Each product has a unique formulation and uses varying ratios of our extract types. Our CBD Isolate is over 99% pure CBD.

7. What is the best method of use?

For our dietary supplements we can only recommend them for internal consumption. Our CBD isolate is for research purposes only. If you don’t like the flavor of the oil supplements, you can mix with something sweet like apple sauce or honey to cut through the flavor.

8. What’s the ideal serving size for me, and how often should I take it?

There is no easy answer to this. Our starting recommended serving size is 15 drops but we generally recommend experimenting to see what feels best to you. Some prefer 5 drops, some prefer over 50 drops per day.

9. What is the safety of your hemp extracts? Are there negative side effects?

Hemp is considered by many to be generally safe. We’ve never seen or heard of any significant or negative CBD Oil Extractside effects in our years in the industry. That said, we can’t rule them out. Please consult with your physician before using any dietary supplement including Hemp extract supplements.

10. Which of your CBD and hemp products should I get?

As a company who sells various dietary and food supplements, we can’t suggest any of our products for the prevention, treatment or cure of any disease or ailment.

When considering our different dietary hemp products, know that they all come in two strengths. Our Original Hemp blends (Classic Hemp Blend, Hemp Complete, Brainpower oil, & Signature Blend) all have 250+mg of cannabinoids per fluid ounce, and our concentrated blends have 1,500+mg per fluid ounce, six times the potency of our traditional oils. We’ve found that sometimes less is more, but nevertheless, some people like to take very large serving sizes of our hemp extracts.

The main difference between the four Original Blends is the additional herbal ingredients besides hemp. We suggest you research the separate components of each blend to determine which product may be most appealing to add to your dietary regimen. If you know it’s solely the hemp extract that you are looking for, with no additional ingredients, then Classic Hemp Blend or Classic Hemp 6x is what you’re looking for.

For dabbing and vaporizing or for research you can try our CBD Isolate.

THOSE WHO SUSPECT THEY MAY HAVE A DISEASE OR ARE SEEKING HELP FOR A DISEASE SHOULD CONSULT A QUALIFIED MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL.

11. Why do people use Hemp Extracts and CBD? What are the benefits and uses of CBD?

In accordance with federal regulations we cannot make health claims regarding our dietary supplement products. We can only recommend our products for general wellness.

12. Is a standard hemp seed oil the same as a high-CBD hemp extract?

Hemp Oil For Dogs

Hemp Oil For Dogs

Absolutely not. Standard hemp oil, which can be found very cheaply at a grocery store, is a much different product than our CO2 hemp extracts (not from seed). Standard hemp oil is produced by cold pressing the seeds, whereas our hemp extract is a supercritical CO2 extraction of the hemp plant itself, not the seeds. Hemp seed oil is considered to be a great nutritive food, but it doesn’t have the naturally occurring terpenes, cannabinoids and other components that our extracts do have.

13. Do I need to move to Colorado to get your Hemp Extracts and CBD? Where do you ship?

No. We actually source our hemp from Kentucky, as it’s legal to ship across state lines. Many people are under the impression that the only way to acquire hemp extracts and CBD for themselves or a loved one is to move to Colorado or another cannabis-friendly state. Many major news outlets are misinformed and are unfortunately spreading the idea that you can only get CBD oil in the states where medical marijuana has been legalized. This is simply not the case though. Because our extracts comes from hemp instead of marijuana, we can and do ship to all fifty states, and no medical marijuana card is needed. There are some exceptions, like with Indiana, Missouri and South Dakota we can’t sell our concentrated products due to state legislation.

We also ship to Japan, Australia, the EU, Switzerland, and Brazil. For all EU orders contact our exclusive distributor thereCannawell.

14. Is your Hemp Extract Oil similar to Rick Simpson Hemp Oil?

Not quite. Ours are from hemp and RSHO is usually using marijuana, a different form of cannabis than industrial hemp. Our industrial hemp extracts are more standardized and will usually have a much higher content of non-psychoactive cannabinoids like CBD than one produced through the Rick Simpson method. And oils produced through his method will usually have a much higher THC content, as it’s typically marijuana that is used for RSHO.†

Generally speaking, most marijuana producers and sellers (especially on the black market) don’t test for contaminants (metals, pesticides, bacteria, etc.). Rick Simpson Hemp Oil is actually more a method of extraction than it is a specific product. People use the Rick Simpson method with hundreds of different strains of marijuana, so the THC, CBD and other cannabinoid content of the final oil is always varying greatly, depending on the cannabis the consumers are acquiring. Usually what’s used for Rick Simpson oil is a strain with an inferior CBD content (and high THC), because that’s what the vast amount of marijuana is nowadays.

15. Where do you source your hemp and CBD from?

We have partners in Kentucky who grew a dedicated plot for us this year (2016) which is being used in our products now. mjna message boardWe also currently source from Europe but we’ll be changing that soon.

16. What kind of testing/analysis is performed on your products?

We have an industry leading quality control system, and we have third party laboratories analyze all of our hemp extracts and our final products for cannabinoid potency, heavy metals, bacterial and microbial life, mycotoxins (fungus), and pesticides.

17. What is CO2 extraction? What’s the difference between subcritical and supercritical CO2 extractions?

CO2 extraction is an extraction process that uses pressurized carbon dioxide to extract phyto-chemicals (such as CBD, CBG, or terpenes, flavonoids, etc.) from a plant. CO2 at certain temperatures and pressures acts like a solvent, without the dangers of actually being one. It is the most expensive extraction method, and is widely considered the most effective and safest plant extraction method in the world.

Many hemp and CBD companies boast about their supercritical CO2 extractions, but that’s actually only one (and perhaps an inferior) method of using a CO2 extraction machine. There are also subcritical CO2 extractions, and ‘mid-critical’, a general range between subcritical and supercritical. Subcritical (low temp, low pressure) CO2 extractions take more time and produce smaller yields than super-critical, but they retain the essential oils, terpenes, and other sensitive chemicals within the plant. Supercritical, on the other hand, is a high pressure and high temperature process that damages most terpenes and heat sensitive chemicals, but can extract much larger molecules such as lipids (omega 3 and 6), chlorophyll, and waxes. A truly full-spectrum CO2 extract includes first performing a subcritical extraction, separating the extracted oil, and then extracting the same plant material using supercritical pressure, and then homogenizing both oil extracts into one. In the essential oil industry, an extract made using this specific process is referred to as a CO2 Total.

18. What is the endocannabinoid system (ECS)?

“The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of endogenous cannabinoid receptors located in the mammalian brain and throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems, consisting of neuromodulatory lipids and their receptors.” Wikipedia

There are two main types of receptors in the ECS, CB1 and CB2. CB1 receptors are primarily located in the central nervous system and brains of mammals, and CB2 are generally found in the peripheral nervous system. There are two main cannabinoids mammals produce- 2AG and Anandamide (named after the Sanskrit term “ananda” which translates to “peace”).

For hundreds of millions of years every vertebrate on Earth has been equipped with this ECS, a crucial system in the body, and it has been known about in the scientific and medical communities since the 1980’s. However, it’s still not taught about in most medical schools.

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